May 2-6, 2022 - Virtual via Zoom

Sessions times are listed in Pacific Standard Time (PST).

Return to Breakout Session Search

Wednesday, May 4, 2022

Wednesday - Morning Session A - 9:00 - 10:30 AM

WA1: Teaming with Families and Professionals: Working to Support the Needs of Children with Developmental Disabilities

Wednesday - Morning Session A - 9:00 - 10:30 AM

WA3: Toward Earlier Identification and Strengths-Based Intervention for Infants and Toddlers with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

Wednesday - Morning Session B - 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

WA2: Three Steps to Resilience

Wednesday - Afternoon Session A - 1:00 - 2:30 PM

WP1: Engaging with and Supporting Fathers

Wednesday - Afternoon Session B - 1:00 - 3:30 PM

WP2: CVI Schedule: Supporting the Young Child with Cortical Visual Impairment with a Routines Based Approach

Wednesday - Evening Session A - 7:00 - 8:00 PM

WE1: Achieving a Better Life Experience through Financial Support Programs

Wednesday - Evening Session B - 7:00 - 9:00 PM

WE2: Supporting Language Development for Children of All Abilities




9:00 - 10:30 AM Wednesday - Morning Session A

WA1: Teaming with Families and Professionals: Working to Support the Needs of Children with Developmental Disabilities, presented by Karen Nelson, Karen Nelson, with Kaylee Richmond, Boost Collaborative, Lyndsee Vargas, Boost Collaborative Children & Family Support Service
The intention of this session will be to discuss evidence-based strategies and how to apply them in an early intervention teaming approach to support the best outcomes for children birth to three with developmental disabilities or delays. Professionals and parents will expand their knowledge of working as a team to support young children.

Age Group Addressed: Birth to Age 3

Who Should Attend: Parents, Foster Parents, Relative Care Givers, Teachers, Trainers, Adult Educators, All, Administrators, Therapists, Healthcare Staff, Home Visitors, Family Resources Coordinators, Interested Professionals, Students

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will gain resources about teaming using evidence-based approaches in practical settings.
  • Participants will be able to reflect on what they are already doing as a team and set a goal or goals on how to improve their teaming skills.
  • Participates will have increased knowledge about practical teaming approaches they can use to support young children and families with disabilities or developmental delays.

This is an Intermediate session. some information or knowledge about early intervention services.

Handouts:


9:00 - 10:30 AM Wednesday - Morning Session A

WA3: Toward Earlier Identification and Strengths-Based Intervention for Infants and Toddlers with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure, presented by Misty Pruner (bio), Seattle Children's Research Institute
Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) can disrupt children’s neurodevelopment and exert lasting influences on overall child well-being and family functioning. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the early developmental outcomes of infants and toddlers with PAE based on 10 years of retrospective clinical data (i.e., standardized assessment data and caregiver report). Although there is extensive research on school-age children and youth, there is a limited body of research describing the developmental delays, sensory processing differences and emotional and behavioral challenges among infants and toddlers with PAE. In addition, little research has focused on the positive attributes and strengths of these very young children, which can buffer against developmental vulnerability and potential risk factors in this population.

Age Group Addressed: Birth to Age 3

Who Should Attend: All

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will learn about the prevalence and patterns of neurodevelopment, sensory processing, and emotional and behavioral functioning in very young children with PAE.
  • Participants will learn about caregivers’ most frequently reported concerns and strengths at the time of their child’s FASD diagnostic evaluation.
  • Participants will be introduced to a relationship-based early intervention for infants and toddlers with PAE that is currently under development – the Families Moving Forward Bridges Program.

This is an Intermediate session.

Handouts:


9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Wednesday - Morning Session B

WA2: Three Steps to Resilience, presented by Betty Peralta (bio), Alta: Alternative Learning & Therapeutic Avenues
This NeuroRelational Framework 101 will help you familiarize yourself with the three steps of moving a child who has experienced trauma from struggling to resilient. The NRF is not a new adaption; it is a framework that holds tools you can use in conjunction with any program you use. In this 3-hour workshop, we will discuss how developmental trauma affects learning, and then delve into the NRF’s three steps: (1) how to recognize threat responses in children, (2) how to help their brains sense safety before challenging them, and (3) how to address all four levels of brain development needs in order to lessen their stress and increase their ability to learn and thrive.

Age Group Addressed: Birth through Age 8

Who Should Attend: All

Handouts:


1:00 - 2:30 PM Wednesday - Afternoon Session A

WP1: Engaging with and Supporting Fathers, presented by Louis Mendoza (bio), WA State Fathers Network, with Nelson Rascon, DadsMOVE
An issue faced by many organizations that provide services and support to families is, how to engage fathers. In this workshop we'll present documentation and first hand knowledge to engage the audience in a discussion of how to address this issue. This workshop is directed toward service providers but the presenters welcome the attendance and perspective of parents.

Age Group Addressed: Adults

Who Should Attend: All

Learning Objectives:

  • The Importance Of And How To Be Welcoming of Fathers
  • Men Want To Be Good Fathers, How To Be Of Help.
  • Assisting Men In Finding Support For Themselves.

Handouts:


1:00 - 3:30 PM Wednesday - Afternoon Session B

WP2: CVI Schedule: Supporting the Young Child with Cortical Visual Impairment with a Routines Based Approach, presented by DeEtte Snyder (bio), Washington State School for the Blind, with Emma Packard (bio), None
Brain-based visual impairment, also known as cerebral/cortical visual impairment or CVI, is the most common form of childhood blindness. Research in the field of blindness and low vision (BLV) has indicated that as much as 35% of all children with BLV have a neurologic or brain based BLV rather than an ocular impairment. The eyes see, but the brain is what interprets and learns from visual information. Therefore, the partnership between the eyes and brain are critically important to an effective visual system.
CVI is sometimes misunderstood by parents, teachers, and other related service providers because while the eyes may be healthy, the child does not use their vision as expected and may appear blind. Also, eye care professionals, such ophthalmologists and optometrist may not understand the nature of diagnosed neurological medical conditions or risks associated with CVI and may hesitant to diagnosis a neurologic visual impairment when vision is not impacted by an ocular condition.
Vision is the primary sensory mode to learning. A long history of research related to vision and learning has established that up to 85% of what a child learns in the first 3 years of life is through vision. Babies use vision to observe, model/imitate, and connect to their primary caregivers, for instance. Also, babies learn to crawl and move towards people and objects they see and want to obtain. When visual access is limited the potential to impact all areas of development is great. Typically, with ocular blindness or low vision, strategies to utilize other sensory modalities is the focus, in addition to visual accommodations. However, for CVI, unlike ocular-based impacts, the potential for improvement in visual functioning, through brain plasticity at a young age, when given appropriate supports and interventions, is also great.
Therefore, it is dependent on the early childhood community to help identify when a child is not using their vision as expected, have medical or neurologic risk factors, and exhibit the presence of CVI characteristics. The identification of CVI is critical to receive appropriate early support from teachers of the visually impaired (TVI) to capitalize on brain plasticity. Even before a confirmed diagnosis, the goal is to provide the necessary visual supports to assist in visual functioning and overall learning within the natural routines of the child and family. Often children with CVI have additional special needs, which complicate their learning challenges but also highlight the critical need for visual intervention and support. TVI’s are available to provide direct services, however other service providers and families can also capitalize on brain plasticity and improve visual functioning by providing the visual supports throughout the day. Teaming practices are key for effective implementation and progress.
This workshop will provide an overall view of CVI including the neurologic conditions that increase the risk for CVI and the visual behaviors associated with this visual impairment. Specifically, participants will explore the use of routine-based learning strategy called “a CVI schedule”, that provides access to visual information through accommodations during daily activities, which are determined by each caregiver and supported by the IFSP or IEP team including the TVI and other important service providers. This routine based approach is a promising practice that is a critical component of family centered practices and is appropriate for use with all families across the continuum of racial, cultural, and economic diversity.

Age Group Addressed: Birth to Age 3, Birth through Age 5

Who Should Attend: Parents, Foster Parents, Relative Care Givers, Teachers, Therapists, Home Visitors, Family Resources Coordinators, Students

Learning Objectives:

  • 1.Identify 3 leading causes or risk factors of neurologic or cortical visual impairment.
  • 2. Describe the role of vision on early learning and the potential impact on other developmental domains when visual access is limited.
  • 3. Describe the potential improvement of overall visual functioning given visual support through daily routines.
  • 4. Utilize a CVI schedule in collaboration with a child’s family and teacher of the visually impaired to provide environmental accommodations for visual access in learning during routine daily activities.

Handouts:


7:00 - 8:00 PM Wednesday - Evening Session A

WE1: Achieving a Better Life Experience through Financial Support Programs, presented by Peter Tassoni (bio), WA Dept of Commerce, with Tamara Roberts (bio), Arc Washington State
Provide an overview of the Achieving a Better Life Experience 529A savings plan and the special needs trust Developmental Disabilities Endowment Trust Fund available for people with disabilities. These plans allow folks to save beyond the $2,000 limit required by benefit programs. Many families enroll their youngsters into the program to start saving for future expenses related to the child's disability. These plans become vital during the high school transition years as the child moves into adulthood. We will share the nuts and bolts about the two plans in a compare and contrast format, show some statistics on enrollees and their saving / spending behaviors and finally talk a bit about estate planning trends related to plan participants.

Age Group Addressed: All age groups

Who Should Attend: Parents, Foster Parents, Relative Care Givers, Teachers, Trainers, Adult Educators, Healthcare Staff, Family Resources Coordinators, Interested Professionals, Students

Learning Objectives:

  • Overview of ABLE and DDETF as financial instruments to preserve disability benefits while increase wealth
  • Share statistics on enrollees and their saving / spending behavior
  • Provide resources on financial literacy and these saving plans in particular

Handouts:


7:00 - 9:00 PM Wednesday - Evening Session B

WE2: Supporting Language Development for Children of All Abilities, presented by Michelle Duhon, Northwest Center Kids, IMPACT, with Erica Yuen (bio), Northwest Center
In this session, we will explore the typical language development milestones for children from infancy through 5 years old. We will identify possible delays and challenges that some children may experience as they develop these skills. Additionally, we will offer classroom strategies to support language development, and ways to partner with families to address possible concerns.

Age Group Addressed: Birth through Age 5

Who Should Attend: All

Learning Objectives:

  • Define Language Development Terms –
    We will explore the differences between; language skills/communication skills, receptive/expressive language, and nonverbal/non-vocal/nonspeaking.
  • Review Early Language Developmental Milestones –
    We will examine the typical developmental language milestones for children from birth-five.
  • Explore Types of Language Delays –
    In this section we will briefly identify possible language delays (with an understanding that we are not physicians or licensed specialists who can diagnose language delays).
  • Partnering with Families –
    If a concern arises about a child’s language development, how should teachers share it with the family? We will discuss ways to partner closely with families to share concerns and resources they can access for further information.
  • Strategies for Supporting Language Development –
    We will share multiple strategies for supporting overall language development. These are universal strategies which will support an entire classroom as they grow these skills.

Handouts:




Schedule-At-A-Glance
Program Search

Daily Schedules:
Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday

Return to IECC website
For Additional Information
Contact:


Amanda Cardwell
Conference Coordinator
AC Consulting
Stanwood, WA 98292
Email: amandacardwell@frontier.com

Mike Stewart
Conference Administrator
Boyer Children's Clinic
1850 Boyer Avenue E.
Seattle, WA 98112
Email: info@boyercc.org

Tree
Copyright © 2022 IECConference, Inc. All rights reserved. info@ieccwa.org