May 2-6, 2022 - Virtual via Zoom

Sessions times are listed in Pacific Standard Time (PST).

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Monday, May 2, 2022

Monday - Morning Keynote - 9:00 - 10:30 AM

MK: Monday Keynote: Positionality: Locating a Personal and Professional Position

Monday - Morning Session A - 10:30 - 11:30 AM

MA1: Part C to B Transition: Understanding How Systems Impact our Children and Families

Monday - Morning Session B - 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

MA2: Supporting Play, Language, and Social-Emotional Skills in Toddler Classrooms using ToddlerTalk Strategies

Monday - Afternoon Session - 1:00 - 2:30 PM

MP1: A Neuroaffirmative Approach to Neurodiversity and Disability

Monday - Afternoon Session - 1:00 - 2:30 PM

MP2: Unlocking the Mystery of the Pre-K Continuum

Monday - Evening Session A - 7:00 - 8:00 PM

ME1: Families of Color: Cultivating Relationships

Monday - Evening Session B - 7:00 - 8:30 PM

ME2: Supporting Social Emotional Learning in Inclusive Early Childhood Settings: Cultivating Friendship Skills




9:00 - 10:30 AM Monday - Morning Keynote

MK: Monday Keynote: Positionality: Locating a Personal and Professional Position, presented by Kendra S. Liljenquist (bio), .
Positionality refers to a person’s occupation or adoption of a position in relation to others, usually in relation to sociocultural identifiers. It helps locate a person in the context of other individuals, social groups, and to society based on the identities assumed by them or ascribed to them. Positionality firmly relates to the concept of intersectionality, a term drawn from the American civil rights movement which refers to the intersection of these overlapping identities which are also related to systems of dominance, oppression, and discrimination. These concepts are deeply rooted in the fields of social work and sociology but applied to theory and practice in many disciplines and also a common frame of reference in qualitative research. Join us for this one hour keynote to consider personal & professional positionality, focus on cultural humility, & explore how these elements effect your work with families.

Age Group Addressed: All age groups

Who Should Attend: All

Handouts:


10:30 - 11:30 AM Monday - Morning Session A

MA1: Part C to B Transition: Understanding How Systems Impact our Children and Families, presented by Valerie Arnold (bio), DCYF, Ryan Guzman (bio), OSPI
Join representatives from OSPI and DCYF ESIT in a conversation to review key updates in our early childhood special education systems. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss and better understand Washingtons Administrative Codes that regulate IDEA, Part C and B. In addition we will learn and discuss new and innovative policy and procedural changes taking place within the Part C system. Lastly, participants will have the opportunity learn essential practices from ESIT Provider Agencies and local districts that ensure a seamless transition for both child and family from Part C to B educational systems.

Age Group Addressed: Birth to Age 3

Who Should Attend: All

Handouts:


10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Monday - Morning Session B

MA2: Supporting Play, Language, and Social-Emotional Skills in Toddler Classrooms using ToddlerTalk Strategies, presented by Jennifer Cunningham (bio), University of Washington, with Shawna Harbin (bio), University of Washington
In this presentation, we will share strategies from the ToddlerTalk intervention framework. ToddlerTalk strategies are designed to support toddlers’ early language and social emotional development in classroom settings. ToddlerTalk is focused on strategies that educators can use across the day during their ongoing routines and activities in the classroom to build relationships and support each and every child’s development.

Age Group Addressed: Birth to Age 3

Who Should Attend: Teachers, Interested Professionals, Trainers, Adult Educators

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the importance of play, social-emotional, and language development for toddlers, and how these domains of development relate and influence each other.
  • Identify key considerations for setting up the environment and selecting toys and materials to support interest and engagement for each and every child.
  • Identify strategies for engaging toddlers in play with toys, adults, and peers.
  • Identify strategies for modeling and expanding language and communication during play and routines in the classroom.

Handouts:


1:00 - 2:30 PM Monday - Afternoon Session

MP1: A Neuroaffirmative Approach to Neurodiversity and Disability, presented by Kristin Schneider (bio), Music Works Northwest, with Natalie Shannon (bio), Elizabeth VanSant (bio)
In this presentation, music therapists from Music Works Northwest will share their journey toward a neuroaffirmative approach to their practice, including the benefits and challenges of providing therapy with this approach, strategies for neuroaffirmative treatment planning, resources from neurodivergent voices when working with children with disabilities. This presentation is appropriate for therapists, teachers, parents, or anyone who works with disabled or neurodivergent children of any age.

Age Group Addressed: All age groups

Who Should Attend: Parents, Foster Parents, Relative Care Givers, Teachers, Administrators, Therapists, Interested Professionals, Students

Learning Objectives:

  • Objective 1: Participants will be able to describe the neurodiversity movement and a neuroaffirmative approach to therapy, including its origins and common misconceptions.
  • Objective 2: Participants will be able to identify at least three ways in which one’s use of language, treatment planning, documentation, and reporting tools can communicate and encourage client sense of safety and a neuroaffirmative approach to care.
  • Objective 3: Participants will identify at least one goal for themselves for their practice that aligns with a neuroaffirmative approach to care.

Handouts:


1:00 - 2:30 PM Monday - Afternoon Session

MP2: Unlocking the Mystery of the Pre-K Continuum, presented by Kerri Blankenship (bio), Capital Region ESD 113
In Washington state, only 21% of students ages 3-5 receiving special education services attend and receive thoseservices in a regular early childhood classroom.
This places Washington fourth from last in the nation and onlyabove those states not funding PreK programming.
This training seeks to improve equitable access formarginalized students by building the understanding of representatives- teachers, administrators, andparents/guardians- making programming, placement, and services delivery decisions for students ages 3-5
receiving special education services.

Age Group Addressed: Age 3 through 5

Who Should Attend: Parents, Foster Parents, Relative Care Givers, Teachers, Administrators

Handouts:


7:00 - 8:00 PM Monday - Evening Session A

ME1: Families of Color: Cultivating Relationships, presented by Shawn Koyano (bio), Families of Color Seattle, with Fatima Attia (bio), Families of Color Seattle
In this session it is our goal to educate and inform families and practitioners about the short and long term benefits of offering a safe space for and cultivating relationships with families of color. From being able to comfortably and safely vent out individual and shared lived experiences, to having space to do critical introspective work using questions posed by the really well cultivated curriculum- individuals and families are able to process and get curious about their identity, how they will raise their children, their fears, their traumas etc. We will discuss how to comfortably navigate questions regarding race, identity, community, equity and how these are not ‘bad words’ in our space. In fact, they are the bases of our entire conversation. They lead us to discuss such questions as “What is your earliest memory of racism” (spoiler alert, each story has kids, younger than you’re probably picturing. Holding onto traumas from childhood and sharing them as funny anecdotes are often what you hear). another big question “how is your identity similar to your child, how is it different”. In many families, their race is the same, or partly the same as their child, but in many, there’s a layer of difference where a lot of fear lies and that is with ability. Many people of color have always feared that the lack of belonging and opportunities would exist for their children as they have for themselves, after having a child with an exceptionality, these fears only grew exponentially, many of our parents are able bodied, neurotypical, and the child’s identity differs there. These conversations are necessary, and having the safe place we build together to discuss and discover the answers together is just so powerful and meaningful and critical.

Age Group Addressed: All age groups

Who Should Attend: Parents, Foster Parents, Relative Care Givers, Teachers, Administrators, Therapists, Family Resources Coordinators, Interested Professionals, Students, Trainers, Adult Educators

Learning Objectives:

  • Empower families to seek support and understand a potential unmet need.
  • Encourage organizations/ practitioners to help fill the need of BIPOC families to have more support.
  • Outline how Boyer and FOCS has begun to fill the need for supports for BIPOC/ parents of children with exceptionalities.

7:00 - 8:30 PM Monday - Evening Session B

ME2: Supporting Social Emotional Learning in Inclusive Early Childhood Settings: Cultivating Friendship Skills, presented by Ariane Gauvreau (bio), University of Washington Haring Center
This presentation will draw from Washington State Pyramid Model training content, and focus specifically on the importance of and strategies for supporting all young children develop meaningful relationships with one another within inclusive classrooms. We will review the research on the importance of friendships, discuss specific strategies for implementing these practices in early childhood classrooms, and develop plans for teaching friendship skills.

Age Group Addressed: All age groups

Who Should Attend: All, Parents, Foster Parents, Relative Care Givers, Teachers, Administrators

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will explain the longterm outcomes of young children who have friendships in early childhood
  • Participants will understand the importance of creating a culture of friendship in their classrooms, and strategies for embedding friendship skills across the day.
  • Participants will create plans for implementing friendship skills in their classroom or program, including plans for supporting children with disabilities with this important skill.

Handouts:




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Contact:


Amanda Cardwell
Conference Coordinator
AC Consulting
Stanwood, WA 98292
Email: amandacardwell@frontier.com

Mike Stewart
Conference Administrator
Boyer Children's Clinic
1850 Boyer Avenue E.
Seattle, WA 98112
Email: info@boyercc.org

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