May 5, 2021—Preconference
May 6 & 7, 2021—Conference and Exhibits
Greater Tacoma Convention Center, Tacoma, WA

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Preconference Sessions - 9:00 AM–5:00 PM

PRE01: My Eyes are Fine, But I Can’t See: Supporting the Young Child with Cortical Visual Impairment
PRE02: Assessment and Treatment for Childhood Apraxia of Speech in Young Children
PRE03: Infant Mental Health 101: An Introduction to Infant Mental Health
PRE04: The Growing Brain; Promoting Healthy Brain Development from Birth to 5
PRE05: A Healing-Centered Approach
PRE06: Siblings: Concerns, Opportunities, and Effective Support Strategies for Parents and Providers
PRE07: Supporting Families in their Home Language: Cultural Considerations and Collaborating with Interpreters
PRE08: Day One: Teaching Pyramid Observation Tool: Reliability Training
PRE09: Promoting Social-Emotional Development and Addressing Challenging Behavior in Infants and Toddlers
PRE10: Engaging Conflict and Navigating Change




9:00 AM–5:00 PM Preconference Sessions

PRE01: My Eyes are Fine, But I Can’t See: Supporting the Young Child with Cortical Visual Impairment, presented by DeEtte Snyder (bio), PhD, Washington State School for the Blind, with Julia Erman (bio), BA, Sandbox Software, Tracey Gaver (bio), MA, Kindering
This hands on and interactive workshop will explore the impact of blindness and visual impairment on early learning in all development domains, especially when the visual impairment is brain based and not ocular. But most importantly, explore ways families and all educational professionals can support children’s learning given a visual limitation. Brain-based visual impairment, also known as cortical visual impairment or CVI, is the most common form of childhood blindness and is highly misunderstood by parents and teachers because the eyes are “fine”, but the child does not use vision as expected. Often children with CVI have additional special needs, which complicate their learning challenges but also highlights the need for visual intervention and support.
This workshop will explore the many causes of CVI, visual behaviors associated with this unique visual impairment, and assessment strategies to pinpoint appropriate learning strategies or environmental accommodations. Participants will learn about the impact of vision loss on learning and development through hands on activities and be introduced to specific learning strategies to remediate and assist children through all sensory modalities in accessing the learning environment, including the home. Participants will gain skills in addressing vision concerns of parents or educational teams using screening tools to identify vision problems that can impact learning and then what to do with this information once obtained. Finally, the role of the certified teacher of the visually impaired (TVI) will be explored as a vital team member of educational teams for children aged birth to 5 in the home and in the school setting. This workshop will be facilitated by TVIs from around the state.

WA State Early Learning Core Competency: Child Growth, Development and Learning

Age Group Addressed: Birth through Age 5

Who Should Attend: All, Parents, Foster Parents, Relative Care Givers, Teachers, Administrators, Therapists, Healthcare Staff, Home Visitors, Family Resources Coordinators, Interested Professionals, Students, Trainers, Adult Educators

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the leading causes of visual impairment in the US and understand the diversity of children with visual impairments and blindness.
  • Recognize the risk factors for CVI and identify the unique visual characteristics of children with CVI.
  • Explain the role of vision on early learning and learn basic strategies to adapt home/school environments and intervention strategies to encourage skills in all developmental domains given the impact of CVI.
  • Collaborate with a teacher of children visual impairments (TVI) to meet the unique learning needs of children with CVI and their families.



PRE02: Assessment and Treatment for Childhood Apraxia of Speech in Young Children, presented by Ruth Stoeckel (bio), PhD, SLP
This workshop will discuss challenges in making a diagnosis of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) in young children. Evidence based practice for evaluating and treating young children with suspected or confirmed CAS will be covered, including participant activities and video examples.

WA State Early Learning Core Competency: Child Growth, Development and Learning

Age Group Addressed: Birth to Age 3, Birth through Age 5, Birth through Age 8, Age 3 through 5, Age 5 through 8

Who Should Attend: Teachers, Therapists, Healthcare Staff, Home Visitors, Family Resources Coordinators, Interested Professionals, Students

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify challenges in diagnosis of CAS in young children
  • Describe age-appropriate diagnostic procedures
  • Explain appropriate strategies for suspect or confirmed diagnosis of CAS

This is an Intermediate session. Basic background in communication disorders in young children

Materials Provided: handouts will be shared electronically




PRE03: Infant Mental Health 101: An Introduction to Infant Mental Health, presented by Carol Good (bio), MSW, Parent-Child Relationship Programs
This is a day long intensive overview of Infant Mental Health/Early Childhood Mental Health. We will cover the foundations of early attachment, impact of early adversity, and importance of parent-child relationship in intervention.

WA State Early Learning Core Competency: Child Growth, Development and Learning

Age Group Addressed: All age groups

Who Should Attend: All

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the impact of early adversity on infant and child development
  • Become familiar with Attachment Theory
  • Understand the importance of the Parent-Child relationship in intervention
  • Practice parent-child observation skills

Materials Provided: Copies of Powerpoint handouts




PRE04: The Growing Brain; Promoting Healthy Brain Development from Birth to 5, presented by Maia Thomas (bio), MPH, Early Supports for Infants and Toddlers, DCYF
Decades of research indicate that the early years of life are a period of exponential brain development, characterized by great opportunity and vulnerability, dependent on the relationships and environment in which the child is growing. This innovative training focuses on giving early childhood providers evidence-informed understanding of their vital role in building healthy brains. The curriculum fills a unique niche by providing a comprehensive understanding of how the brain develops, along with ways the provider can encourage healthy brain development in children. Participants will learn strategies for:
1.Informing their practice with an understanding of early brain development
2.Supporting pro-social behavior and social-emotional development.
3.Reducing toxic stress that can negatively influence brain development of very young children

WA State Early Learning Core Competency: Child Growth, Development and Learning

Age Group Addressed: Birth through Age 5

Who Should Attend: All

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the parts of the brain and their functions.
  • Identify factors that positively and negatively affect brain development.
  • Understand how to social-emotional development unfolds, and how to support it.
  • Understand the roles of relationships and stress on social-emotional development
  • Understand the role of daily interactions in guiding brain development.

This session has a $10 materials fee.

Materials Provided: Full-color, spiral bound participant manual (apprx. 75 pages total). Crafts and misc. items used for group activities during the session. Light snacks.




PRE05: A Healing-Centered Approach, presented by Betty Peralta (bio), MS, ALTA: Alternative Learning & Therapeutic Avenues
Join us as we explore how biases affect development and what you can do to reverse the damage. Learn how to identify toxic stress in babies and young children; how structural racism and bias engender this toxic stress; and how you are and can be more of a healing force for generational trauma in the families you serve. The NeuroRelational Framework (NRF) shows us how to respond to even the most challenging behaviors in ways that promote social emotional development through relationship. Come build skills in teaching babies, young children, and their families how to become connected under conflict through co-regulation and co-reflection. And learn how these skills keep our children’s futures safe from prison and set them on a path to fulfilling lives.

Conventional discipline—time outs, sticker charts, withholding privileges, and ignoring, reinforce the stress that gave rise to challenging behavior in the first place. They may push children into internalizing behaviors or escalate externalizing ones. This is especially true for children in toxic stress due to intergenerational trauma and other developmental disturbances like autism. Such practices put everyone's nervous systems on edge. They cause ruptures in important relationships, which harms social emotional development and jeopardizes futures.


These common approaches to discipline reflect a compliance lens of behavior, one that perpetuates the cradle to prison pipeline. Children who are any combination of brown, male, and acting out begin a pattern of stigmatization and shame starting in early childhood.

The NeuroRelational Framework (NRF) shows us how to respond to even the most challenging child behaviors in ways that strengthen relationships and promote social emotional development. Rather than compliance, it uses a safety-challenge-threat lens of behavior where it prioritizes relational safety, introduces challenge, and uses threat responses as cues to pull children back into safety. Both children and adults build skills in regulation, connection under conflict, and reflection in the process, all skills that keep our children out of prison and set them safely on a path to fulfilling lives.

Understanding the brain means that we can stop shaming children for where they are in their neurological development. Instead, we can meet children where they are, grow all of our social emotional capabilities, and disrupt the cradle to prison pipeline for those most in peril.

WA State Early Learning Core Competency: Interactions

Age Group Addressed: All age groups

Who Should Attend: All

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how the status quo compliance model of discipline promotes inequity and re-traumatization
  • Understand how the NeuroRelational Framework and its brain- body- and relationship-based interventions protect children from the cradle to prison pipeline and help all children develop
  • Use theory-specific language with colleagues that shift consultations on children from a compliance lens of behavior to a safety-challenge-threat lens
  • Reduce both internalizing and externalizing behaviors in children by learning how to assess and address stress, relational safety, and brain system strengths and vulnerabilities
  • Establish emotional safety for children, introduce developmentally appropriate challenge, and identify threat responses in both children and ourselves.

This is an Intermediate session. This presentation is differentiated to all skill levels.

Handouts:




PRE06: Siblings: Concerns, Opportunities, and Effective Support Strategies for Parents and Providers, presented by Emily Holl (bio), MFA; MSW, Kindering
Throughout their lives, siblings share many of the same concerns that parents of children with special needs experience, as well as issues that are uniquely theirs. Siblings typically experience these issues for longer than any other family member, as the sibling relationship can easily exceed 65 years. Because of the important role siblings play in the lives of their brothers and sisters with special needs and families, siblings and their concerns must not be ignored. Supporting siblings can contribute to lasting positive outcomes for children with disabilities and their entire families. Join us for a full-day, pre-conference workshop exploring siblings’ concerns, opportunities, and effective support strategies for parents and providers. The highlight of the workshop will be a panel of adult siblings reflecting on their experiences growing up, and sharing their insight on how we can better understand and support siblings.

WA State Early Learning Core Competency: Families and Community Partnerships

Age Group Addressed: All age groups

Who Should Attend: All

Learning Objectives:

  • How to identify common concerns experienced by young brothers and sisters
  • Strategies to decrease concerns and increase opportunities for even the youngest siblings
  • How to help your agency provide “sibling-friendly” services
  • How to launch Sibshops, an award-winning, kid-friendly mix of support and recreation
  • Change how your agency thinks about and provides family support

Materials Provided: Handouts




PRE07: Supporting Families in their Home Language: Cultural Considerations and Collaborating with Interpreters, presented by Sarina Murrell (bio), MS, Mountain View Whisman School District
While English has come to be considered as the global language for business and travel, there are many people who live in an English-dominant setting (the United States) without a good grasp on the language. For these people with young children in our school systems, special education services, medical settings, and play groups, how can we effectively communicate with the children and their parents if English is not their home language?

When language barriers exist, it is common for the limited-English communicators to feel frustrated, powerless or alienated. For the English-speaking communication partners, crossing language and cultural barriers has more to do with recognizing one's own biases and attitudes toward language differences than it does with simply speaking another language.

In this presentation, participants will receive information on how to expand their understanding and acceptance of cultural-linguistic differences, as well as some strategies to work more effectively with these limited-English families. In additional, a large part of practice and resources will be dedicated to collaborating with interpreters.

Participants will receive a workbook and resources to assist them in working effectively with children and families who do not speak English or for whom English is a second language.

WA State Early Learning Core Competency: Families and Community Partnerships

Age Group Addressed: All age groups

Who Should Attend: All

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize the diversity of languages across the world, country and state
  • Understand and self-evaluate biases and attitudes towards language differences
  • Develop a plan to collaborate more effectively with interpreters
  • Apply suggestions and utilize provided resources for working effectively with children and families for whom English is not the home language

This session has a $10 materials fee.

Materials Provided: Interactive course workbook: -Thought-Provoking Exercises -Reflective Journaling Tools -Step-by-Step Guides to Collaborate with Interpreters -Blank Session Plans -Parent Handouts -Glossary (definitions of key terms)




PRE08: Day One: Teaching Pyramid Observation Tool: Reliability Training, presented by Kathleen Meeker (bio), PhD, University of Washington and Haring Center
The Teaching Pyramid Observation Tool (TPOT) measures preschool teachers' implementation of Pyramid Model practices to support young children's social-emotional development. This reliability workshop prepares participants in the use of the TPOT instrument to gather information on preschool teachers’ implementation of Pyramid Model practices for use in coaching and program planning. This is an intensive 2 day workshop that requires prerequisite knowledge of the Pyramid Model and participation in the entire workshop. Upon successful completion of this workshop, participants will receive a certificate indicating they are reliable with the TPOT development team. Participants will also need to register for session TFD01 on Thursday.

WA State Early Learning Core Competency: Curriculum and Learning Environment

Age Group Addressed: Age 3 through 5

Who Should Attend: Teachers, Administrators, Interested Professionals, Trainers, Adult Educators

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the Teaching Pyramid Observation Tool and its uses
  • Reliably identify key practices associated with the Pyramid Model from video and interviews
  • Score key practices consistently with an expert coder

This is an Advanced session. In order to participate in the TPOT workshop, all attendees should be familiar with the Pyramid Model and have completed Pyramid Model training (e.g., CSEFEL preschool modules). Participants are strongly encouraged to review the Inventory of Practices for Promoting Children’s Social Emotional Competence that is available from http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/modules/module1/handout4.pdf prior to attending the workshop. If participants have limited background in the Pyramid Model, they are strongly encouraged to visit these Pyramid Model websites to view videos and presentations. http://challengingbehavior.fmhi.usf.edu/do/pyramid_model.htm http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/resources/videos.html

This session has a $70 materials fee.

Materials Provided: Each participant will receive a TPOT scoring manual, two official TPOT scoring guides, a scoring notebook, a certificate of reliability (after passing the check-out process), and a folder with handouts/resources.




PRE09: Promoting Social-Emotional Development and Addressing Challenging Behavior in Infants and Toddlers, presented by Jennifer Fung (bio), PhD, Haring Center for Inclusive Education
Many factors, both biological and environmental, can influence the development of critical social-emotional skills and prosocial behaviors in very young children. Persistent challenging behaviors can impact learning, relationships, and participation in family routines.

The goal of this session is to build the capacity of coaches, educators, families, and family support professionals to implement a positive behavior support framework that enhances social-emotional learning and supports the use of positive behaviors.

WA State Early Learning Core Competency: Child Growth, Development and Learning

Age Group Addressed: Birth to Age 3

Who Should Attend: Parents, Foster Parents, Relative Care Givers, Teachers, Therapists, Home Visitors, Family Resources Coordinators, Students

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe importance of social emotional development and how it happens
  • Describe how environments and climate support social-emotional development
  • Plan strategies to promote emotional literacy throughout daily routines
  • Describe relationship between challenging behavior and communication
  • Use observation to see patterns and determine meaning of challenging behavior



PRE10: Engaging Conflict and Navigating Change, presented by Greg Abell (bio), BA, Sound Options Group, LLC
Two significant challenges facing agencies and teams is the effective engagement of conflict and the implementation of change. This session will explore the intersection between these two constructs and introduce skills and strategies for increasing individual and collective capacity for these two challenges.

WA State Early Learning Core Competency: Program Planning and Development

Age Group Addressed: All age groups

Who Should Attend: All

Learning Objectives:

  • Introduce paradigms for better understanding the experiences of conflict and change.
  • Introduce strategies for effectively engaging these challenges.
  • Introduce skills for effectively communicating in these contexts.

This is an Intermediate session.




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For Additional Information
Contact:


Amanda Cardwell
Conference Coordinator
AC Consulting
Stanwood, WA 98292
Email: amandacardwell@frontier.com

Mike Stewart
Conference Administrator
Boyer Children's Clinic
1850 Boyer Avenue E.
Seattle, WA 98112
Email: info@boyercc.org



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